Prioritizing Foot Care

Feet are usually the last thing on our minds when we think of health and wellness.  They are “the low item on the totem pole.”  Our feet are almost always covered and serve their purpose with little fuss.  We may take extra care when sandal weather arrives, but otherwise, they aren’t a priority in the daily routine.  And this is unfortunate!

Foot care is vital to overall health and wellness and should be a priority – especially for seniors.

Over time, feet flatten and become wider.  The fatty padding naturally wears down and leaves bones and joints more exposed to wear and tear.  This can make individuals more vulnerable to falls.  For the elderly, falls may lead to complications because their bodies are not as equipped to withstand trauma.  They can’t heal as rapidly.  Even simple foot injuries like blisters, corns, ingrown toenails, and calluses can impair mobility, balance, and overall function in older adults.  

Here are a few tips for optimal foot care for your loved one. 

  1. Keep feet clean.  Sounds overly simple, but it’s important!  Wash daily with soap and water.  Dry between the toes.
  2. Keep feet moisturized.  A good lotion helps to prevent cracks and breaks in the skin.
  3. Trim nails.  Overgrown and ingrown toenails are painful, and foot pain increases the risk for a fall tremendously. 
  4. Those with diabetes need to take extra care.  Diabetics should trim nails straight across and avoid cutting into the corners.  Diabetics can have decreased sensation in their feet, making it more difficult to feel pain.  You might opt to visit a podiatrist periodically to avoid cutting nails too short.  Nails that are cut too short can lead to infection and then potentially loss of limb if not caught early enough.  Check feet daily for blisters, cuts, scratches, and sores.
  5. Ensure footwear properly fits.  Ill-fitting shoes, whether too small or too large, may cause problems for your loved one.  Shoes that are too small can cause blisters and cut off circulation.  Shoes that are too large make movement difficult and increase the risk of falls.  A rule of thumb when buying shoes: there should ½ inch between your big toe and the end of the shoe, and the shoe should be just as wide as your feet.
  6. Protect your feet.  Bare feet may be comfy, but we encourage wearing socks and shoes as much as possible, especially while walking outside.  Wear shoes that protect your feet from cold and wet weather conditions.  Ensure socks are made of natural fibers like cotton or wool.
  7. Check circulation.  As we age, circulation decreases – especially if we have diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, heart conditions, or other health concerns.  Encourage your loved one to elevate his/her feet whenever possible to encourage return circulation to the heart.  Monitor color and temperature of feet.  This will give you helpful clues on the condition of circulation.  Also, foot massages help with circulation.  (This is a good opportunity to check their feet in a natural, non-threatening way.)

Backup Plans

Life is rocking along (not easily because you’re a caregiver, and caregiving isn’t easy).  But you are caring for your mom, and she is enrolled in an adult day program and enjoying it.  Or you are caring for your spouse, and you have in-home care to help several days a week.  Or your dad is living with you, and he is in the early stages of his disease, so he is fine to be left home alone.

Whatever the case, your current situation is working.

Until…

  • You, the caregiver, get pneumonia and are hospitalized.
  • Your sister, who helps you care for your parent, is in a serious car wreck and is hospitalized.
  • Your adult child is diagnosed with a major illness, and you have to care for him/her too.
  • Your mom stops sleeping at night, and no one in the house can get rest.
  • Your loved one becomes incontinent, and you can’t manage his care at home anymore.

What’s your plan?

What if your current situation doesn’t work tomorrow?  We don’t want to think that something tragic might happen in our family or that our loved one might suddenly decline, but these things happen all too often.

As a caregiver, it is a good idea to have a backup plan that you can implement quickly.  If a backup plan is not in place, you may find yourself without options in a crisis.  And it’s difficult to make quick decisions when you’re under emotional strain.

Make a backup plan that works for your family and your situation, and don’t delay.  Here are some examples:

Family and/or Friends

Who would come over at the drop of a hat to care for your loved one if necessary?  These are people who could come to your home and stay with your loved one for a few hours or days (or who would let your loved one stay at their house).  Maybe it’s a family member, neighbor, friend, or fellow church member.  Get a list together, and let those people know that they are your backup.

In-Home Care

Set up services with an in-home care agency.  Interview agencies, pick the one you like, sign a contract, and have them ready to start services when/if needed.  You could start off with having an agency caregiver provide services once or twice a week to get your loved one used to the idea.  Or you could just have a contract in place when/if the services are ever needed.

Residential Memory Care

This level of care is a facility with a secure unit, where your loved one can move in.  These facilities are staffed with direct care staff, nurses, and often social workers, who assist and monitor your loved one.  Your loved one will receive bathing/hygiene services, meals, activities, housekeeping, etc.  There are many facilities that provide this level of service.  You could tour facilities now, narrow down to the one you like, and put down a deposit.  Putting down a deposit does not mean you have to move your loved one in soon.  It means you are interested.  If you get offered an available space but don’t need it yet, you can say, “We aren’t ready right now, but keep us on the list.”

You may never use your backup plan, but it is good to have one just in case.  Your future self will thank you.  If you would like to talk more about backup plans and get some feedback and advice for your particular situation, give us a call at 901-854-1200 and/or make an appointment to come by and see us.

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  • February 28, 2020

    Prioritizing Foot Care

    Feet are usually the last thing on our minds when we think of health and wellness.  They are “the low item on the totem pole.”  Our feet are almost always covered and serve their purpose with little fuss.  We may take extra care when sandal weather arrives, but otherwise, they aren’t a priority in the daily routine.  And this is unfortunate!

    Foot care is vital to overall health and wellness and should be a priority – especially for seniors.

    Over time, feet flatten and become wider.  The fatty padding naturally wears down and leaves bones and joints more exposed to wear and tear.  This can make individuals more vulnerable to falls.  For the elderly, falls may lead to complications because their bodies are not as equipped to withstand trauma.  They can’t heal as rapidly.  Even simple foot injuries like blisters, corns, ingrown toenails, and calluses can impair mobility, balance, and overall function in older adults.  

    Here are a few tips for optimal foot care for your loved one. 

    1. Keep feet clean.  Sounds overly simple, but it’s important!  Wash daily with soap and water.  Dry between the toes.
    2. Keep feet moisturized.  A good lotion helps to prevent cracks and breaks in the skin.
    3. Trim nails.  Overgrown and ingrown toenails are painful, and foot pain increases the risk for a fall tremendously. 
    4. Those with diabetes need to take extra care.  Diabetics should trim nails straight across and avoid cutting into the corners.  Diabetics can have decreased sensation in their feet, making it more difficult to feel pain.  You might opt to visit a podiatrist periodically to avoid cutting nails too short.  Nails that are cut too short can lead to infection and then potentially loss of limb if not caught early enough.  Check feet daily for blisters, cuts, scratches, and sores.
    5. Ensure footwear properly fits.  Ill-fitting shoes, whether too small or too large, may cause problems for your loved one.  Shoes that are too small can cause blisters and cut off circulation.  Shoes that are too large make movement difficult and increase the risk of falls.  A rule of thumb when buying shoes: there should ½ inch between your big toe and the end of the shoe, and the shoe should be just as wide as your feet.
    6. Protect your feet.  Bare feet may be comfy, but we encourage wearing socks and shoes as much as possible, especially while walking outside.  Wear shoes that protect your feet from cold and wet weather conditions.  Ensure socks are made of natural fibers like cotton or wool.
    7. Check circulation.  As we age, circulation decreases – especially if we have diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, heart conditions, or other health concerns.  Encourage your loved one to elevate his/her feet whenever possible to encourage return circulation to the heart.  Monitor color and temperature of feet.  This will give you helpful clues on the condition of circulation.  Also, foot massages help with circulation.  (This is a good opportunity to check their feet in a natural, non-threatening way.)

    February 7, 2020

    Backup Plans

    Life is rocking along (not easily because you’re a caregiver, and caregiving isn’t easy).  But you are caring for your mom, and she is enrolled in an adult day program and enjoying it.  Or you are caring for your spouse, and you have in-home care to help several days a week.  Or your dad is living with you, and he is in the early stages of his disease, so he is fine to be left home alone.

    Whatever the case, your current situation is working.

    Until…

    • You, the caregiver, get pneumonia and are hospitalized.
    • Your sister, who helps you care for your parent, is in a serious car wreck and is hospitalized.
    • Your adult child is diagnosed with a major illness, and you have to care for him/her too.
    • Your mom stops sleeping at night, and no one in the house can get rest.
    • Your loved one becomes incontinent, and you can’t manage his care at home anymore.

    What’s your plan?

    What if your current situation doesn’t work tomorrow?  We don’t want to think that something tragic might happen in our family or that our loved one might suddenly decline, but these things happen all too often.

    As a caregiver, it is a good idea to have a backup plan that you can implement quickly.  If a backup plan is not in place, you may find yourself without options in a crisis.  And it’s difficult to make quick decisions when you’re under emotional strain.

    Make a backup plan that works for your family and your situation, and don’t delay.  Here are some examples:

    Family and/or Friends

    Who would come over at the drop of a hat to care for your loved one if necessary?  These are people who could come to your home and stay with your loved one for a few hours or days (or who would let your loved one stay at their house).  Maybe it’s a family member, neighbor, friend, or fellow church member.  Get a list together, and let those people know that they are your backup.

    In-Home Care

    Set up services with an in-home care agency.  Interview agencies, pick the one you like, sign a contract, and have them ready to start services when/if needed.  You could start off with having an agency caregiver provide services once or twice a week to get your loved one used to the idea.  Or you could just have a contract in place when/if the services are ever needed.

    Residential Memory Care

    This level of care is a facility with a secure unit, where your loved one can move in.  These facilities are staffed with direct care staff, nurses, and often social workers, who assist and monitor your loved one.  Your loved one will receive bathing/hygiene services, meals, activities, housekeeping, etc.  There are many facilities that provide this level of service.  You could tour facilities now, narrow down to the one you like, and put down a deposit.  Putting down a deposit does not mean you have to move your loved one in soon.  It means you are interested.  If you get offered an available space but don’t need it yet, you can say, “We aren’t ready right now, but keep us on the list.”

    You may never use your backup plan, but it is good to have one just in case.  Your future self will thank you.  If you would like to talk more about backup plans and get some feedback and advice for your particular situation, give us a call at 901-854-1200 and/or make an appointment to come by and see us.